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And even the brightest, most ambitious college women are permitting them to dominate the sexual culture.

Dating Add to the mix that college-age kids depend heavily on the immediacy of texts, Gchats, and Instagram to talk with each other.

At Harvard, these are the eight all-male social groups called final clubs.

Each club owns a beautiful mansion in Harvard Square, and many of them have existed for a century or more.

We account for 57 percent of college enrollment in the U. and earn 60 percent of bachelor's degrees, according to the National Center for Education Statistics, and this gender gap will continue to increase through 2020, the center predicts.

But I'm still not comfortable with Rosin's assertion that "feminist progress...depends on the existence of hookup culture."The career-focused and hyper-confident types of women upon whom Rosin focuses her argument reappeared in Kate Taylor's July 2013 feature "She Can Play That Game Too." In Taylor's story, female students at Penn speak proudly about the "cost-benefit" analyses and "low-investment costs" of hooking up as compared to being in committed relationships.

In the words of a fellow Harvard girl, "These dweeby Harvard dudes are picking from a group of awesome women.

This leads to awkward, sub-text-laden conversations, of which I've been on both sides."The great irony is that no one seems to enjoy playing the whoever-cares-less-wins game.

Rosin argues that hookup culture marks the empowerment of career-minded college women.

It does seem that, now more than ever, women are ruling the school.

I could've told Nate that I thought we had a plan..I was hurt when he ditched me..I was annoyed when he decided to pull away after wrongly assuming I'd wanted to make him my boyfriend. Instead, we ignored each other, knowing that whoever cares less wins.

As my guy friend Parker, 22, explains, "I think people in college are embarrassed to want to be in a relationship, as though wanting commitment makes them some regressive '50s Stepford person.

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