Vassar college dating scene

Dox: But you can stick your cards right up your nose. (Such as the outcome of a voting.) This is most often used for comedy: typically, the rhyme set up and subverted was clearly supposed to be a profanity. We do everything together like hide and go seek, your favorite game.

A rhyming couplet is set up, (and you watch your hopes get up) but rather than using a rhyme, (being accomplished on a dime) the speaker takes it in a different, non-euphonic direction, (but maybe not in need of course correction) either by speaking a different word, (could be one you've never heard) having it bleeped out, (lest you be creeped out) or cutting off an offending section. You said something about how I was smart and I make your life a living heaven.

Depending upon cost an interurban's route either followed its own dedicated right-of-way or, with permission from the state/county, could be laid right next to a rural road.

The latter alternative was cheaper but the resulting grades and curves were less than ideal, a problem only compounded when freight movements were involved.

That said, the trope can be used for comedy without implying profanity, just by making the way the rhyme is going totally obvious and then not going there. So he came along to us, the Anti-Shoddy Goods Committee, And we told him very plainly why he felt so ruddy sh— shocking.

Galinda: Let us rejoicify that goodness could subdue / The wicked workings of you-know-who / Isn't it nice to know? / The truth we all believe'll by and by / Outlive a lie / For you and...

There was also the added perk of providing some freight business.

As interubans expanded they did indeed initially prove popular offering quick service, multiple schedules daily (the large Illinois Traction system, for instance, was dispatching 106 trains out of Springfield, Illinois everyday by 1906), and with fares only a few cents each way.

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It is rather amazing so much capital was expended on these operations, which struggled to make a profit right from the start.By 1950 just 1,519 miles remained and the number dropped to 209 miles by 1959.As William Middleton notes in his book, " The interurban was conceived as a transit system, developed from the basic streetcars of the era.As these technologies found their way to the United States the first examples appeared in the 1880's; in 1880 Thomas Edison tested an experimental electric locomotive, powered by a dynamo, which was operated on a stretch of track in Menlo Park, New Jersey. George Hilton and John Due's authoritative piece, "," points out the birth of the true American interurban began when Frank Sprague developed an electric motorcar in 1886 for the New York Elevated Railway whereby the motor(s) were situated between the axle, along with a trolley pole and multiple-unit control stand.This gave way to the typical streetcar which became such a common sight throughout America.

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